Friday Five!

Happy Friday, readers! It took me a few days to adjust from the jet lag, but after taking all the yoga classes, making/consuming all the smoothies, and having all the kitten snuggles, I think I’m pretty much fully re-adjusted to my Boston life. It feels the same, but different. Between a month abroad, and the new moon on Wednesday, I am feeling a lot of transformative juju, and I think the rest of this summer is going to provide some positive and necessary changes.

Here is a picture I took in London. I loved a lot of the street art there, and these fluorescent Power to the People signs were the best things ever:

2015-06-06 13.26.26-1

And now, four things from the internet + a list of stuff from the week that made me happy!

***

On Veganism, Eating Disorder Recovery, and “No” Foods

In case you missed the latest of Gena’s beautiful essays, I highly recommend checking this one out. It tackles the very real dilemma of the idea of food restriction (or “no” foods) that confront those of us who are both vegan and in eating disorder recovery. How can we heal from eating disorder mentality (if it is indeed an ED related to food restriction and “bad” foods) if part of our entire way of life, as vegans, is dedicated to eliminating entire food groups? I feel lucky that the way I view not eating meat and dairy feels very different mentally than not eating, say, sugar or fat (or whatever else I was deciding was “bad” for me at the time). But that’s not the case for everyone, and so many ED specialists try to counsel patients into practicing a sort of lack of attachment to food, as a way to stop obsessing about it. Gena pushes back on that; she writes: “I…dislike any suggestion that food should be without meaning or importance, even if it’s offered for the sake of overcoming the anxieties and fears of an ED. For one thing, food isn’t meaningless or without importance. It is profoundly important to all of mankind, because we are creatures with rich inner lives and complex feelings and a tapestry of culture in addition to the fact that we have bodies, and those bodies have nutritional demands. The fact that food is meaningful to us is evidenced in our rich culinary traditions, in the importance we place on gathering at a table and breaking bread, in our rich legacy of cookbooks and recipes. I went on a date once with a man who told me that if there were a fullness pill, he’d take it, because he had a busy life and considered eating to be a strain on his schedule. But such individuals really are few and far between. I challenge most anyone to say that food is just food, or just fuel. And it strikes me as especially unrealistic to think that anyone who has struggled with an ED would be able to make such a claim. For most of us, food is meaningful and important. The question is, can we channel that meaning into positive, healthful, and self-loving directions?” I recommend reading the whole article if this is something you or someone you know has struggled with.

7 LGBT Issues That Matter More Than Marriage

This is just a friendly reminder that although it’s important and significant and generally pretty wonderful that marriage equality is now the law of the US land, that there are things to organize for beyond marriage. I have assigned this helpful Buzzfeed piece in classes before, and I think now more than ever is a time to remind our movements that the recent SCOTUS decision will not help ameliorate the things that impact the most marginalized members of the LGBTQ community, like homelessness, lack of health care access, disporportionate prison and policing, suicide, racial violence, etc. I’m stoked to party at more weddings, but let’s keep fighting for justice and liberation, yeah?! <3

6 Steps You Can Take to Start Healing from Trauma

This piece from CarmenLeah Ascensio provides a thoughtful, informed, and important list of ways we can take care of ourselves after traumatic experiences, no matter how long ago they happened. I’ve vaguely mentioned on here that I was recently diagnosed with PTSD and so the subject of trauma has become something I have been literally incapable of ignoring during my healing and recovery process. Lists like these are very welcome additions to my toolbox of coping mechanisms.

Chopped Kale Salad + Creamy Almond Ginger Dressing 

Well, this beautiful salad from Edible Perspective is basically all the things that I love in a bowl. Kale, radishes, mushrooms, avocado, cabbage, asparagus, and zucchini create the luscious base for the delicious-sounding almond ginger dressing. I love salads all year round, but this crispy goodness sounds especially perfect for this hot July weather. Nom.

untitled-1036

Stuff from the Week that Made Me Happy

as much as I loved being England, I was happy that my week started off by landing back in the states!; (that said, it also made me happy this week to reflect on all the great memories from the trip); SMOOTHIES made me happy this week, along with all the other food I have been consuming that I had not been able to eat while abroad (mostly just lots of kale and turmeric :)); hot summer weather; yoga & sculpt; being reunited with my handsomest boycat and getting allllll the snuggles; dinners with friends; a very relaxing and restorative ladies pool day; phone calls & Skype calls; planning fun things to do with a certain upcoming British visitor;  LaCroix (it’s so refreshing, guys); this cat video; & a real sense of optimism that things/my perspective are shifting for the better. <3

***

What made you happy this week? xoxo

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6 thoughts on “Friday Five!

  1. lacy j. davis says:

    lady, i am so happy your back and SO HAPPY i get to see you soon!!!!!!! Life is very exciting right now. Also, unrelated- that choosing raw article. OMG. she’s so good.

  2. FoodFeud says:

    Welcome back!
    Love the Gena article. The 4th of July was actually kind of hard for me, even though there were nice people and vegan food available at the party I went to but it reminded me that recovery is a long road.
    Loving that salad too. I need to get back to putting onion and cucumber in salads.
    Glad you are back on the kale and turmeric train! Hope you are feeling well!

  3. alexanderperchov says:

    Thanks for the kale salad recipe and all the rad social commentary, rebel grrrl

    On Friday, July 3, 2015, .rebel grrrl living. wrote:

    > raechel posted: “Happy Friday, readers! It took me a few days to > adjust from the jet lag, but after taking all the yoga classes, > making/consuming all the smoothies, and having all the kitten snuggles, I > think I’m pretty much fully re-adjusted to my Boston life. It feels t” Respond > to this post by replying above this line > New post on *.rebel grrrl living.* > Friday Five! > by raechel > > > Happy Friday, readers! It took me a few days to adjust from the jet lag, > but after taking all the yoga classes, making/consuming all the smoothies, > and having all the kitten snuggles, I think I’m pretty much fully > re-adjusted to my Boston life. It feels the same, but different. Between a > month abroad, and the new moon on Wednesday, I am feeling a lot of > transformative juju, and I think the rest of this summer is going to > provide some positive and necessary changes. > > Here is a picture I took in London. I loved a lot of the street art there, > and these fluorescent Power to the People signs were the best things ever: > > [image: 2015-06-06 13.26.26-1] > > > And now, four things from the internet + a list of stuff from the week > that made me happy! > > *** > > *On Veganism, Eating Disorder Recovery, and “No” Foods > * > > In case you missed the latest of Gena’s beautiful essays, I highly > recommend checking this one out. It tackles the very real dilemma of the > idea of food restriction (or “no” foods) that confront those of us who are > both vegan and in eating disorder recovery. How can we heal from eating > disorder mentality (if it is indeed an ED related to food restriction and > “bad” foods) if part of our entire way of life, as vegans, is dedicated to > eliminating entire food groups? I feel lucky that the way I view not eating > meat and dairy feels very different mentally than not eating, say, sugar or > fat (or whatever else I was deciding was “bad” for me at the time). But > that’s not the case for everyone, and so many ED specialists try to counsel > patients into practicing a sort of lack of attachment to food, as a way to > stop obsessing about it. Gena pushes back

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