Friday Five!

Dear friends,

I hope this Friday finds you well. I have had kind of a tough week, but then last night I sang along really loud to some old favorites while I baked some birthday treats for a friend, and suddenly things felt pretty great again!

Here are some things for you. I hope you like them. I like you. <3

love,

raechel

1. Roasted Kabocha Squash Soup

Okay, I have a confession….I’ve never had kabocha squash! People are smitten with it in the healthy food blog world, but I’ve just never had the pleasure. This soup seems like a great place to start with it, right? Yum!

2. “An End to Self-Care”?

This week, there was a huge debate about self-care that exploded on the internet in social justice/activist communities, as well as holistic/wellness communities (or, more specifically, those at the intersection). An article by B.Loewe posted on Organizing Upgrade argued that self-care (which he equated to things like yoga, bodywork, etc.) was ultimately selfish and not helpful in moving forward a plan for a better world. As you might imagine, I had some feelings. Fortunately, a bunch of really amazing people wrote very insightful responses, many defending self-care as something more akin to what Ms. Audre Lorde describes below:

(I’m so glad this conversation is happening and I hope that activist communities are pushed to transform in positive ways for both the movement and individuals within the movement!)

3. Americans Eat Their Weight in GMOs

This GMO stuff is getting truly scary. A recent report from the Environmental Working Group on Agriculture revealed that “[o]n average, people eat an estimated 193 pounds of genetically engineered food in a 12-month period. The typical American adult weighs 179 pounds.” And this is a conservative estimate.

If this is outraging to you, consider getting involved with supporting California’s Prop 37!

4. Halloween Goodies

If you’re super into Halloween (like me!) and want some spook-dorable, healthy-ish food ideas to celebrate, never fear, there are a lot of bloggers doing some super creative things! I plan to do a “Halloween Recipe Round-Up” next week, but here’s a sneak peak from Oh She Glows and Fork & Beans:

Raw “Witches Fingers”

Vegan Halloween “Rolo’s”

SO CUTE, RIGHT?! I mean, like, spooky-cute. : )

5. Eco-friendly DIY Halloween Costumes

So, other than food, the best part of Halloween is obvs the costumes, right?! I have dressed up every single year of my life and I have no plans to stop! Here’s a list of some “green” Halloween costumes from Inhabitat. I’m sort of into the toxic-waste poisoned mermaid:

Speaking of Halloween costumes, please remember that the holiday is not an excuse to be racist!

***********

Sooo! What are YOU going to be for Halloween?!?!!!!! Have you had kabocha squash? Do you, like me, always think of “koMboucha” when you hear that name, and secretly hope they are somehow related? Do you like making spooky/cute Halloween treats? Are you disgusted with this GMO stuff? Any thoughts on self-care?

Happy weekend! xoxoox

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10 thoughts on “Friday Five!

  1. Arv says:

    Oh boy, I have some thoughts: last summer, I read a book called Tomorrow’s Table: Organic Farming, Genetics, and the Future of Food, written by a plant geneticist and her organic farmer husband — they are both professors of their respective fields at UC Davis, in California. Amazingly, the worlds of the husband and wife team are a LOT less at odds with one another than the media might have us believe. I think what happens in the public eye is that the POLITICS of agribusiness and big, scary names like Monsanto and Dupont get wrapped up into the issue of GMO, making anything with that label sound big and scary, too. In her book, Pamela Ronald (the geneticist) recounts how her work on genetically modified rice strains has helped small, local village farmers in places like India and Vietnam resist devastating floods that have the potential to literally ruin livelihoods. AND, GMO foods actually help farmers REDUCE their reliance on toxic pesticides, which (as you know) have proven to be incredibly harmful to farmhands. It was definitely interesting to see a scientific, fact-based, and independent view on the topic (as a professor who helps small farmers in developing countries, this lady has no interest whatsoever in major agribusiness, so it’s not like a “Monstanto-backed study” or anything like that). The bottom line, she ultimately says, is that it will be a combination of organic farming and genetic modification that will create sustainable farming in the future.

    Sorry for the rant, but I just get so passionate about these kinds of things!!

    More importantly, I made a squash soup this week, too….so I am all over that Kabocha recipe.

    Love & hugs & happy Friday!

    :)

    • raechel @the rebel grrrl kitchen says:

      Arv, thank you for taking the time to respond to this! That book sounds fascinating. I guess for me it feels worrisome that we don’t know the effects of GMOs, and more so that we aren’t given the option to know if we’re eating them. But I really should read that book to learn more!

      • aratota says:

        And your concern is totally legitimate — it’s uncharted territory, and consumers do have a right to know. It’s just interesting to see both sides!

  2. Lou says:

    Oh I LOVE the toxic-waste mermaid thingy…. wicked idea ;) The whole Halloween thing isn’t that big on this side of the world, so it’s always a little fascinating to see how everyone goes CRAZY for it over where you are. Sad about people using it as an excuse to be racist though, that’s a bit disturbing.

    Yes yes, people seem to be obsessed with kaboucha squash…. we call it Jap Pumpkin…. I think it’s the same thing? Confusing! It’s yummy, anyhow.

    Happy weekend, lovely gal!

  3. Natalia says:

    Hi Raechel,

    I am so, so happy to have come across your blog. Sorry in advance if this turns into a ramble, but here goes: this year has been this crazy, up-and-down one for me.To cut a long story short, I found myself diving head first into the world of health and wellness, discovering green juices and the power of nourishing food to cure the soul (I can really relate to your earlier post of turning into a reluctant hippie ;) ). At the same time, I enrolled myself into a postgrad paper at uni in health psychology – it is, without a doubt, the most inspiring course I have ever taken at university. It has challenged me in so many ways – and made me humbly admit that I am not a politically savvy person, but I want/NEED to be, to address the disquiet that was always brewing, but is now tearing at my heart in a big way. But suddenly I found myself ‘at odds’ with many of the wellness blogs I was following – the incessant talk of personal responsibility of care and CHOICE made no mention of privilege; there was no acknowledgement that not EVERYONE is in the same position. And I grew more and more frustrated (I mean literally, within the last week this has been all Ive been able to think about!), but had no idea where to start looking for answers! And then I came across your blog, and when I read in your ‘ABOUT’ page, it really made me smile (: And today, your link to Loewe’s article (and the responses) was like a little hallelujah moment. Anyway, I guess I just wanted to say thank you for inspiring me, and for being my first point of contact in a community of wellness peeps who care about the greater community too! XO

  4. Natalia says:

    Hi Raechel,

    I am so, so happy to have come across your blog. Sorry in advance if this turns into a ramble, but here goes: this year has been this crazy, up-and-down one for me.To cut a long story short, I found myself diving head first into the world of health and wellness, discovering green juices and the power of nourishing food to cure the soul (I can really relate to your earlier post of turning into a reluctant hippie ;) ). At the same time, I enrolled myself into a postgrad paper at uni in health psychology – it is, without a doubt, the most inspiring course I have ever taken at university. It has challenged me in so many ways – and made me humbly admit that I am not a politically savvy person, but I want/NEED to be, to address the disquiet that was always brewing, but is now tearing at my heart in a big way. But suddenly I found myself ‘at odds’ with many of the wellness blogs I was following – the incessant talk of personal responsibility of care and CHOICE made no mention of privilege; there was no acknowledgement that not EVERYONE is in the same position. And I grew more and more frustrated (I mean literally, within the last week this has been all Ive been able to think about!), but had no idea where to start looking for answers! And then I came across your blog, and when I read in your ‘ABOUT’ page, it really made me smile (: And today, your link to Loewe’s article (and the responses) was like a little hallelujah moment. Anyway, I guess I just wanted to say thank you for inspiring me, and for being my first point of contact in a community of wellness peeps who care about the greater community too! XO

    • raechel @the rebel grrrl kitchen says:

      Natalia, thank you so much for this comment. It means so much to me that there are other people who are invested in these issues, and I am absolutely thrilled that I could be a source of inspiration! : ) It is definitely frustrating that the wellness world is not really keen to talk about privilege, and I know that by doing so on my blog, I turn off a lot of readers. But it’s totally worth not having a huge readership if I know that I speak to the people who “get it.” Thank you again! : )

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